Letter: Reader hopes that Upson Open Space remains a meadow

We invite readers to contribute letters to the editor. Please include a name, address, and phone number and email us at JGoralski@ SouthingtonObserver.com. There is a limit of 350 words.

We invite readers to contribute letters to the editor. Please include a name, address, and phone number and email us at JGoralski@ SouthingtonObserver.com. There is a limit of 350 words.

To the editor:

In regard to the use of the recently purchased open space property on Upson Place, I was interested in the comments addressing the value of meadows made at a recent town meeting. At the time of the sale, I requested to Town Attorney Mark Sciota that such use be considered for the property.

Meadows are beneficial to the survival of many insects, particularly bees which are becoming endangered. The dramatic loss of bees to our environment, with such dependence on bees for our very food supply, can be devastating. Preserving these acres as meadow would provide a positive impact to an ecological system. It would also provide the opportunity for the public to passively experience and enjoy the beauty of so many native plants and wildflowers, as well as butterflies and other native insects in a natural setting.

Considering that this parcel joins the previously purchased wooded parcel off Marion Avenue, it should be noted that wildlife has continuously frequented the area; from the mountain across Marion Avenue into the wooded and wetlands areas and into the field.

Notably there are deer, turkeys, coyotes, bear, bobcat, typical small mammals, red-tailed hawks, peregrine falcons, numerous birds of songbird and blackbird varieties, turtles and snakes, and even a cougar. This would be an opportunity for the town to truly leave a large tract of land with varying habitat for its natural use to be enjoyed by future generations.

In terms of the concern about the field reverting to forest, it can happen. But it will only happen if it is allowed to remain untouched for numerous years to come; meadow grasses and flowers, to growth of small bushes, growth of sapling trees, invasive vines and undesirable plants, with continued growth of bushes and trees, etc., eventually forest and underbrush.

A meadow will remain a meadow if mowed at least every three or so years, before brush and trees have a chance to grow. That is how I maintain my meadow, and I enjoy the bees, birds, butterflies and other wildlife every year. The maintenance cost is minimal, particularly when the environmental and aesthetic benefits are considered.

Please give this Upson tract your consideration.

Elizabeth Upson Stanley, Southington

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