Letter: Reader responds to candidate’s claims in The Observer

We invite readers to contribute letters to the editor. Please include a name, address, and phone number and email us at  JGoralski@ SouthingtonObserver.com. There is a limit of 350 words.

We invite readers to contribute letters to the editor. Please include a name, address, and phone number and email us at JGoralski@ SouthingtonObserver.com. There is a limit of 350 words.

To the editor:

Democratic senatorial candidate Ryan Rogers appears not to understand that a “yes” vote should not be made unless the legislator supports the bill or policy. I hope that Mr. Rogers understands that bills that are needed to run government, which are most of the bills voted on, typically do have bi-partisan support. However, the criteria for assessing a “yes” or “no” vote on a bill where different views are in play are quite another matter.

I’ll make my point by writing about my Democratic state representative in the 81st district, Dave Zoni, who votes “yes” a lot for Democrat policies.

Mr. Zoni voted “yes” for consecutive multi-billion dollars budget increases. The second budget was so ridiculous and out of touch with reality that it was recognized as a failure even as the ink was drying. Our legislators went back into discussion and trimmed (on paper) a billion dollars before Mr. Zoni and the Democrats voted “yes” again and passed it.

There were no desperately needed structural changes in spending or the budget in this revision, and I believe this was band-aid fix to get our politicians through the November election. All revisions can be restored with a “yes” vote after the election.

Mr. Zoni voted “yes” for Sen. Martin M. Looney’s historic property relief bill that set a maximum statewide property tax mill rate for cars and that also required tax payer subsidies to make up for lost property revenues. The high mill rate cities like Hartford and New Haven do well with the new law, but there is no benefit to towns like Southington.

Southington residents and others will pay more in sales taxes to make tax money available to high mill rate cities. There is already a revenue shortfall that will prevent many towns from seeing even a penny from the redistributed tax dollars for property tax relief.

Mr. Rogers may not like all of Sen. Joe Markley’s “no” votes, but I know that Mr. Rogers’ “yes” votes in step with a Democrat majority in the general assembly will not serve Southington well on many important issues.

William Marcarelli, Southington

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