Getting the Led (Zeppelin) out with tomorrow’s ‘classical’ sounds

By MIKE CHAIKEN
EDITIONS EDITOR
Roll over, Beethoven… Led Zeppelin is taking over.
Led Zeppelin’s last studio album, “In Through the Out Door” came out nearly 35 years ago.
Its seminal album, “4,” with the song “Stairway to Heaven” came out 44 years ago.
However, even with the passing decades, Led Zeppelin’s music is still heard on the airwaves and still garners young fans.
The reason for the longevity of Led Zeppelin’s music is simple, explained Bruce Lamont, lead singer for Led Zeppelin 2, a band that mines the music of Led Zeppelin.
“It’s the music that is going to be the classical music of the future. It’s timeless,” said Lamont.
Led Zeppelin 2 is coming to Connecticut on Aug. 7, opening for the Australian Pink Floyd Show at the Toyota Oakdale Theater in Wallingford.
“Young and old go crazy for it,” said Lamont of Led Zeppelin’s music. “It’s really unique.”
Led Zeppelin was fortunate enough to arise in a time where they had time to work on their craft, explained Lamont. They could spend all the time they needed in the studio to record their albums.
Plus, Lamont said, “They always wanted to outdo themselves.”
Lamont—who is joined in Led Zeppelin 2 by Ian Lee (drums), Paul Kamp (guitars), Matthew Longbons (bass)—said Led Zeppelin’s “Presence” has some of his most favorite songs, such as “Achilles Last Stand.” But the singer—who is given the task of recreating Robert Plant’s vocals—felt “Physical Graffiti” stands as the band’s very best work. He is floored by the variety of material on the album and how it “flows really well.”
Over the years, Lamont explained, Robert Plant’s voice evolved. Earlier on, Lamont said, Plant was all about hitting the high notes. Later, Plant developed a more subtle approach to melody.
For a vocalist like himself, Lamont said, it is a challenge to tackle the breadth of Plant’s vocal styles through the years. But he said he loves the challenge.
Some tribute bands will try to offer up note for note reproductions of album tracks.
But, Lamont said Led Zeppelin 2 is more liberal in its approach to the music of the originals. Led Zeppelin 2 started off as a fun sideline to some of the band member’s original projects. And the members never were interested in just “regurgitating” the records of the originals.
And Lamont said taking liberties with the music is keeping in the spirit with the original Led Zeppelin, which was known for being more spontaneous in a live setting.
The Australian Pink Floyd Show, the night’s headliner, is known for its “over the top” productions, said Lamont. So in keeping up with the headliners—while not overshadowing them—Lamont said Led Zeppelin 2 has upped its production values for its tour on bigger stages across the country. The costumes are improved. The light show is more involved. And the sound equipment is larger.
But the primary focus, said Lamont, will be on the band’s performance.
As a headliner, Lamont said Led Zeppelin 2 will perform for 2 ½ hours. As an opener, said Lamont, the band is paring down its set list to 60 minutes. The temptation is to focus on the hits of Led Zeppelin, said Lamont. But the band also wants to highlight Led Zeppelin’s best moments as well with some deeper cuts from the original’s career. But fans can expect the usual highlights of Led Zeppelin’s storied career.
Led Zeppelin 2 opens for the  Australian Pink Floyd Show on Friday, Aug. 7 at 8 p.m. at the Toyota Oakdale Theater in Wallingford. Tickets are $25 and $39.50.
For more information, go to LiveNation.com or look for Led Zeppelin 2 on Facebook.

Led Zeppelin 2 pays homage to British rockers Led Zeppelin on Friday at the Toyota Oakdale Theater. The Chicago-based band opens for the Australian Pink Floyd Show.

Led Zeppelin 2 pays homage to British rockers Led Zeppelin on Friday at the Toyota Oakdale Theater. The Chicago-based band opens for the Australian Pink Floyd Show.

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